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Momentum
Utah Single Tickets

Sun Devil Stadium, Frank Kush Field

On January 14, 2014 Arizona State University kicked off a public fundraising drive in conjunction with its plan to rebuild iconic Sun Devil Stadium. CLICK HERE to learn more about the Momentum! 

Stadium Facts
Name: Sun Devil Stadium, Frank Kush Field
Capacity: 65,870
Largest Crowd: 74,963 ASU vs California, Nov. 9, 1996, ASU 35, California 7
Playing Surface: Natural (Hybrid Bermuda grass).
Lighting: Four banks of quartz-iodide flood lights suspended 200 feet over the playing field.
Stadium Height: 122 feet from playing field to top of grandstand, approximately 12 stories.
Press Box: Located atop the west cantilever, accommodates approximately 300 people on three seating platforms. The 360 x 55-foot facility includes a kitchenette, an eating area and lavatories.
Elevator: Four elevators with one serving the press exclusively.

Sun Devil Stadium/Frank Kush Field

One of the most aesthetic, dynamic, innovative and beautiful collegiate stadiums in the nation, Arizona State University's Sun Devil Stadium has played host to some of the best football games for more than four decades.

It has hosted Arizona State University football games since 1958, including the game on Sept. 21, 1996, when the playing surface was named Frank Kush Field as ASU upset top-ranked Nebraska 19-0. It has hosted four national championships - Notre Dame vs. West Virginia in 1988, Nebraska vs. Florida in 1996, Tennessee vs. Florida State in 1999 and Ohio State vs. Miami in 2003. And it played host to the NFL's ultimate showcase - the 1996 Super Bowl where the Dallas Cowboys pulled out a close win over the Pittsburgh Steelers.

The stadium, a favorite of television production crews, was the the home of the Tostito's Fiesta Bowl for 35 years and the NFL's Arizona Cardinals for 18 seasons. Beginning in 2006, Sun Devil Stadium became the new home of the Insight Bowl. 

The facility, regarded since 1958 as one of the nation's outstanding collegiate football facilities, also boasts a spectacular, second-to-none setting.

A complete playing surface renovation was christened by ASU on Sept. 5, 1992, as the Sun Devils hosted Washington in the season-opener. At a cost of $2 million, the stadium addition accomplished four goals: 1) provided Sun Devil Stadium with a more durable playing surface; 2) provided better patron sight lines in the lower seating levels; 3) expanded sideline area for player safety; and 4) provided advantages to television and print photographers.

Constructed between two mountain buttes, the stadium literally was carved from the desert, and occupies a space between the Tempe buttes - actually small mountains that ideally have accommodated the growth of the structure.

Sun Devil Stadium addresses Phoenix to the west and the south end zone (formerly the open end) points to scenic Tempe, home of Arizona State University.

With the south end expansion completed and the press and sky boxes in place, and with an expanded cantilevered upper deck (1977), Sun Devil Stadium boasts a capacity of 71,706.

 

 

The expansion of 1988, which added a large seating section that completed the oval of the stadium, added almost 1,700 seats to the stadium's capacity. Also added was the Intercollegiate Athletic Complex at the structure's south end, which is now named the Nadine and Ed Carson Student Athlete Center. The building houses the entire realm of the ASU athletic department. A state-of-the-art scoreboard and four-color video replay board were also added.

During the 1978 expansion, design features enabled the stadium to be modernized without light supports, sound system supports, or construction pillars in the viewing line of the spectators. The dramatic proximity of every seat to the playing field is another feature that has made Sun Devil Stadium one of the nation's finest college football arenas.

Originally erected in 1958 (capacity 30,000), the stadium additions were begun in 1976 (boosting capacity to 57,722) and 1977. The latter raised the seating to 70,491.

The expansion effort was an $11 million undertaking, accomplished completely without the aid of state tax monies.

Assisting in a stadium financing plan unlike any other in the nation, the largest and oldest Arizona State support organization, the Sun Angel Foundation, provided $4.5 million of the necessary funding. The Sun Angel contribution was particularly important because it also helped pave the way for bond clearance.

Spectators at stadium events also have helped fund the expansion with their payment of a surcharge on each ticket purchased.

Arizona State has led the Pacific-10 Conference in average attendance seven times (1986, '85, '84, '83, '82, '80 and '79) since joining the league in 1978. ASU finished second six times and third twice. Last year, the Sun Devils drew a home total of 339,890 fans. On a single-game basis, Arizona State averaged 48,556 spectators.

The first game was played in the original structure against West Texas State on October 4, 1958. The Sun Devils triumphed in the baptismal event, taking a 16-13 verdict over the Buffaloes.

Following the 1976 portion of the expansion, Arizona State took a 35-3 victory over Northwestern on September 17, 1977 to continue the winning tradition of stadium christenings.

When the 1977 expansion was completed, the Sun Devils prevailed 42-7 over Pacific to post a hat trick on stadium dedication contests. In 1988, ASU defeated Illinois, 21-16 on September 10, to win its fourth dedication game. In 1989, ASU beat Kansas State 31-0, in the expansion opener.

In 1987, the stadium was filled beyond capacity for the Papal visit, one of the few sites to play host to the Pope's tour of the United States. On April 4, 1976, the New York Cosmos (with Pelé) and the Los Angeles Aztecs played an exhibition soccer game in front of 15,000 fans in the stadium.

In 2008, the New England Patriots used the stadium as their practice facility in preparation for Super Bowl XLII.

In May of 2009, President Barack Obama spoke at ASU's commencement ceremonies in front of a crowd of more than 70,000 people, the largest U.S. audience for Obama since his inauguration.

 

THE CARSON STUDENT ATHLETE CENTER

 

With an excellent playing surface in place, Sun Devil Stadium is the one of the best college football facilities in the country.

The field facelift, along with the 165,000-square-foot Carson Student Athlete Center and the three-story, 60,000-square-foot press box and skybox additions, makes Arizona State's Sun Devil Stadium one of the true showcases of college football.

The press box and skybox facility, which sits atop the upper deck on the west side, contains two 30-suite levels of skyboxes renovated in 1999 and is topped by an ultra-modern press box and eight additional private suites. The facility also boasts its own television production room, complete with editing and chyron capabilities and camera equipment. The equipment is manned by a full crew on game day to give spectators live and replay views of the contest.

 

Served by four industrial-sized elevators - one for the media and three for the public - the facility has working space for more than 200 sportswriters, booth space for broadcasters, statistical crews, scoreboard operations and a rooftop camera deck in addition to suite seating for more than 900 fans.

The bowl (south) end was connected by the dramatic ICA Complex and the extension of the loge-level seats. Locker rooms also were added in the north end visiting teams. Two new scoreboards were put in place in 1999. The color video replay system, situated in the southeast corner, offers fans instant replays of game action. The original video screen was the first of its kind in an on-campus football stadium. A complementary matrix board for messages and statistical information sits in the southwest corner.

Located in the south end of Sun Devil Stadium, the $28 million, 165,000-square-foot Carson Student Athlete Center houses all of ASU's 21 varsity sport coaches, as well as athletic administration.

With the completion of the complex in 1988 and the additions in 2002, the athletic department was centralized in one facility for the first time. The goal was to have the entire department together to improve communication and operations between coaches and administrators.

A view of the Kajikawa Practice Field

 

With the expansion and renovation, the lower three levels are expanded almost to the street. The lower level features the recently improved Sun Devil locker room, a state-of-the-art weight training facility (expanded from 4,000 to 15,000 square feet), an equipment area and the sports medicine department, which includes a Swim-Ex underwater exercise device. One of the few schools in the nation to have the device, ASU's student-athletes have the ability to run, swim or engage in strengthening exercises in the training room. More than 5,000 square feet of working space is available to athletic trainers in the areas of rehabilitation, hydrotherapy, examination, x-ray and treatment, including physician's office with full capabilities such as a pharmacy.

The first floor features the Sun Devil athletic ticket office, a souvenir shop, the media relations office and Bill and Judy Schaefer Sports Hall of Fame, a tribute to former student-athletes, coaches and administrators who have influenced Sun Devil athletics.

The second floor houses ASU's Olympic sport coaches and staff as well as the Academic and Student Services operation. Academic and Student Services have vast study and tutorial areas on this floor as well as a computer lab for ASU's student-athletes. All offices have spectacular views of either Sun Devil Stadium or south Tempe.

The third floor is the headquarters for Sun Devil football, with the head coach, his coordinators, assistant head coach and assistants all on one floor.  In addition to the football offices, the third floor also houses a 150-seat theater and offices for ASU's men's and women's basketball, volleyball and baseball.

The fourth floor accommodates the bridging of the loge level of the stadium. As part of the 1998 project, 1,677 loge level seats were added, and ticket holders in this level have concessions and restroom facilities as well as television monitors for replays.

The fifth floor houses a Stadium Club area, a Varsity A Conference Room as well as offices for the Sun Devil Club.

The sixth floor is devoted to the ICA administrative staff.

 

Progression of Stadiums
Stadium (Years) W L T Pct.
Normal Field (1897-1926; 30 yrs.) 23 12 3 .645
Irish Field (1927-1935; 9 yrs.) 15 13 1 .535
Goodwin Stadium (1936-1958; 23 yrs.)* 66 38 6 .627
Sun Devil Stadium (1958-present, 53 yrs.) 260 95 3 .732

*Capacities - 1936 (5,000); 1940 (10,000); 1941 (15,000)

 

Season Attendance
Year Home
Record
Home
Attendance
Avg./
Game
Total
Games
Total
Attendance
Avg.
All Games
1958 4-2 160,161 26,694 *10 249,669 24,967
1959 7-0 181,300 25,900 11 221,200 20,109
1960 4-2 165,300 27,500 10 215,190 21,519
1961 4-2 167,536 27,550 10 213,836 21,384
1962 6-1-1 216,735 27,092 10 255,085 25,509
1963 5-1 189,024 31,504 9 235,255 26,139
1964 7-0 200,167 28,595 10 265,603 26,560
1965 5-2 208,720 29,817 10 264,073 26,407
1966 3-3 180,732 30,122 10 272,302 27,230
1967 4-2 235,209 39,172 10 340,693 34,069
1968 6-0 210,839 35,140 10 312,130 31,213
1969 5-1 266,269 44,378 10 324,855 32,486
1970 6-0 277,830 46,305 10 374,823 37,482
1971 6-0 302,416 50,403 11 429,618 39,056
1972 5-1 285,904 47,651 11 399,296 36,300
1973 6-0 300,463 50,077 11 411,613 37,419
1974 5-2 334,512 47,787 12 503,731 41,978
1975 7-0 329,644 47,092 11 406,836 36,985
1976 2-5 338,821 48,403 11 466,176 42,380
1977 6-1 398,057 56,865 11 479,078 43,553
1978 5-1 421,249 70,208 11 600,744 54,613
1979 +5-2 488,141 69,734 11 686,013 62,365
1980 6-1 443,018 63,288 11 681,013 61,910
1981 7-0 449,153 64,165 11 621,465 56,497
1982 6-1 457,369 65,338 11 604,114 54,920
1983 5-3 539,786 67,473 11 682,461 62,042
1984 3-5 537,732 67,217 11 658,626 59,875
1985 6-1 454,390 64,913 11 622,056 56,551
1986 6-0-1 486,034 69,433 11 793,398 66,117
1987 4-2-1 493,593 70,513 11 696,131 63,285
1988 4-2 424,300 70,717 11 665,848 60,532
1989 5-3 533,819 66,727 11 680,941 61,904
1990 3-3 373,782 62,297 11 556,474 50,589
1991 3-3 334,287 55,715 11 570,748 51,886
1992 4-2 278,978 46,496 11 495,977 45,089
1993 4-2 294,636 49,106 11 473,063 43,006
1994 2-4 260,811 46,802 11 552,857 50,260
1995 4-2 293,283 48,881 11 567,679 51,607
1996 7-0 447,187 63,884 11 627,710 57,065
1997 4-2 396,086 66,014 12 665,177 55,431
1998 4-2 389,535 64,923 11 646,439 58,767
1999 4-2 355,169 59,195 11 651,297 59,208
2000 3-3 303,671 50,612 11 512,006 41,667
2001 4-3 344,997 49,285 11 519,420 43,606
2002 5-2 320,857 45,837 14 701,198 50,086
2003 4-2 325,488 54,248 12 593,158 49,430
2004 6-0 375,846 62,641 12 705,239 58,770
2005 4-3 428,096 61,157 12 660,754 55,063
2006 4-2 327,369 54,562 13 722,668 55,590
2007 7-1 503,003 62,875 13 772,334 59,410
2008 4-3 446,856 63,837 12 749,940 62,492
2009 3-4 339,890 48,556 12 596,362 49,697
2010 4-2 287,657 47,943 12 656,679 54,723
2011 5-2 413,031 59,004 13 697,235 53,633

*Includes opening games of season in Goodwin Stadium, not reflected in home attendance
at Sun Devil Stadium.
+ Four victories subsequently forfeited.

Top Home Crowds
1. California (Nov.9, 1996) 74,963
2. Southern California (Oct. 19, 1996) 74,947
3. Arizona (Nov. 25, 1989) 74,926
4. Nebraska (Sept. 21, 1996) 74,089
5. Arizona (Nov. 28, 1997) 73,682
6. Washington State (Nov. 1, 1997) 73,644
7. Notre Dame (Oct. 10, 1998) 73,501
8. Arizona (Nov. 23, 1991) 73,427
9. Washington (Sept. 7, 1996) 73,379
10. Arizona (Nov. 26, 1993) 73,115
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